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For men well past their prime, their fluid dance motions pointed to their active life when they were youths.

Only that they would have us believe their younger days were spent not on the dance floors,but in the trenches where, I suspect, they were
digging to lay pipes for communal water or some other altruistic mission.

The public-spirited young-old men – that’s how 90-year-old Bob Mugabe describes himself, and our dancing compatriots aren’t so far from that
milestone – are known as the vigogo (bigwigs) of CORD, the Opposition coalition.

They are, in order of age, former PM Tinga, former VP Wiper and former Foreign Affairs minister Weta.

I like the sound of vigogo, it’s like a sagging oak breaking free, crashing in its fall.

So the three CORD vigogo, swift on their feet and even swifter with
their tongues, descended on Uhuru Park early in the week wearing copycat shirts.

Tinga had declared the day a public holiday, but it was evident that workers had opted to open their
kiosks or whatever it is they do when they are not at work, rather than go to Uhuru Park.

That is,presuming they had work to do.

On the marginal attendance at the park, Tinga quickly blamed the heavy police presence for discouraging more people from venturing there.

It is appropriate at this juncture to fetch the parable of the rain, partly because Tinga likes it quite a bit.

The rain that fails to fall blames the wind for scattering the rainclouds…

But on Monday, the sun came out to shine, vitiating any prospects that the rain Tinga had been warning
about was about to descend.

Still, that’s not to say there would be no rain at Uhuru Park.

Listening to the manner in which Tinga had addressed the nation for several weeks,threatening storms, fire and brimstone if Prezzo UK,
the one Tinga calls his younger brother, did not sit to hear him out, things would get elephant.

For good measure, Tinga clarified well in advance he wasn‘t interested in having tea at UK’s house,
perhaps because he prefers something stronger.

One might mistake this for hubris, after all, where do guests dictate the sort of hospitality they deserve?

But then Tinga is Tinga.

Neither the tea nor the audience was granted by his younger brother.

Even after being spurned, Tinga and his lieutenants did nothing at Uhuru Park other than issue a new edict: time for dialogue was up, they said, even though at this stage it was evident no one was offering the dialogue they were rejecting.

Tinga set his new agenda – 13 and counting – which attested to the valour of the vigogo from CORD.

MASS ACTION

They stopped counting at the number associated with bad luck because they can challenge anyone or anything without fear.

When the vigogo were done counting, their 13 demands could be summarised as one: national
referendum.

And if that was not granted, Tinga
clarified, they would marshal the masses for what they do best: mass action.

I suspect Tinga will soon declare his next course of action thus: if the masses are denied the right to
mass action hata hiyo mass action, itakuwa ni chama! (register mass action as a party).

Which would be just as well, for listening to the rhetoric from the trio, the vigogo from CORD want a
return to the picketing of the 1990s because they see the future through the side-mirror.

“The African Story as told by Africans”.©African News Digest®

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